Holy Spirit: Bond of Love

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Katie Mathes

 

“I don’t want to say I have a favorite person of the Trinity but…”

That statement is the way I start every conversation about the Holy Spirit with my friends. And I usually finish the statement with the words “[but] I do have a special devotion to that Third Person of the Blessed Trinity!”

My devotion to Him started last summer when I would prayerfully reflect on video segments provided by “The Wild Goose is Loose” website, and then continued to grow as I dived into the post-Gospel scripture of the New Testament. Combine that with the fact that I watched the Hallmark series Touched by an Angel for the duration of Lent 2017 (I had sacrificed all other shows for those forty days), and a devotee was born!

This devotion to Him is what is fueling my excitement to talk about Him within the context of the Christian family. But first, a brief summary on an important Catholic teaching regarding the Holy Spirit.

In Roman Catholicism, we believe that the origin of the Holy Spirit is in the love between the Father and the Son. You see, the Father so loved the Son, and the Son so loved the Father, that their mutual bond produced a divine fruit: the Holy Spirit. In fact, the Venerable Archbishop Fulton Sheen says, “[they] give themselves in a love so infinite that… their love can express itself in nothing less than a Person, who is Love” (The Divine Romance: The Blessed Trinity; emphasis added).

And so in the Holy Spirit the role of the Christian family is made complete. What do I mean by this?

I mean that the role of the family is to be a witness to love, and indeed to produce the fruit that is love within their own homes, churches, and communities. Naturally, the tangible fruit of this love is the child, brought into the world through love in order to be loved.

Because this series has been spread out over a long period of time, I would like to (finally!) bring it all together with this: the Father and the Son are meant to be the divine parallels to the roles of the people (parents and children) within the family; the Holy Spirit is meant to be a parallel to that bond of love, that glue, that holds the Christian family together, and is the fruit of each holy relationship.

Ultimately God has assigned the Christian family with two lofty tasks: Being a witness to the existence of the Trinity, and being a witness to love. God’s plan for the family is for it to be a valuable, precious unit within society. It is to His plan that all Christian families should aspire.